Tag Archive for 'Luther'

Luther on Motivation to Pray

This is from Luther on the Christian Life by Carl Trueman.

For Luther, it is not the desire for reading Scripture that fuels prayer; it is reading Scripture that fuels the desire for prayer. That the Christian may not feel like praying is one of the Devil’s tricks played on weak and sinful flesh; the answer is the discipline of reading and meditation, both corporate and individual. One might draw an analogy with marital love: the husband is commanded by God’s Word to love his wife. That command is independent of how the husband feels at any given moment. He is to act in a loving way toward her, and as he does so, his love for her will itself deepen and grow. So it is to be with prayer: reading Scripture shapes people in such a way that their prayer life will deepen and grow as a result.

What is perhaps most noteworthy in all this, of course, is the routine nature of the practice of the Christian life. Nothing Luther proposes in itself is particularly exciting or novel. We live in an age mesmerized both by technique and by the extraordinary. Modern evangelicalism, particularly in America, has been shaped by the kind of revivalism pioneered by Charles Finney in the nineteenth century. Find the right techniques and one will achieve the desired spiritual results; and typically those techniques involve something unusual or impressive. For Luther, this would all have been alien and obnoxious: the Word is powerful in and of itself; and the ways in which the Word works are ordinary and routine.

I may post more quotes from this excellent book in the future.

Luther wrote a letter to his barber called A Simple Way To Pray if you’d like to read more on what he says about prayer. Another good resource is Matthew Henry’s Method for Prayer, which is a website with very brief aspects of prayer and includes Scripture with each one. You can even choose between four Bible translations.

Luther on the Christian Life

Luther on Salvation By Grace Alone

It should be obvious, but I will give my usual Reformed alert here. Not meant for sensitive readers, those with high blood pressure, or those who may be pregnant, and not Reformed.

I like how this is explained by Luther, who is being quoted by Warfield.

“As a man, before he is created, to be a man, does nothing and makes no effort to be a creature; and then, after he has been made and created, does nothing and makes no effort to continue a creature; but both these things alike are done solely by the will of the omnipotent power and goodness of God who without our aid creates and preserves us – but He does not operate in us without our cooperation, seeing that He created and preserved us for this very purpose, that He might operate in us and we cooperate with Him, whether this is done outside His kingdom by general omnipotence, or within His kingdom by the singular power of His Spirit: So then we say that a man before he is renovated into a new creature of the kingdom of the Spirit, does nothing and makes no effort to prepare himself for that renovation and kingdom; and then, after he has been renovated, does nothing, makes no effort to continue in that kingdom; but the Spirit alone does both alike in us, recreating us without our aid, and preserving us when recreated, as also James says, ‘Of His own will begat He us by the word of His power, that we should be the beginning of His creation’ (he is speaking of the renewed creature), but He does not operate apart from us, seeing that He has recreated and preserved us for this very purpose that He might operate in us and we cooperate with Him. Thus through us He preaches, has pity on the poor, consoles the afflicted. But what, then, is attributed to free will? Or rather what is left to it except nothing? Assuredly just nothing.”

What this parallel teaches is that the whole saving work is from God, in the beginning and middle and end; it is a supernatural work throughout. But we are saved that we may live in God; and, in the powers of our new life, do His will in the world. It is the Pauline, Not out of works, but unto good works, which God has afore prepared that we should live in them.

B.B. Warfield, The Theology of the Reformation, quoting Luther

Monergism’s newsletter said, “This is a must-read essay by Warfield. If you have never read this, I would encourage you to take the time to do so”; so I’m reading it! Although if we read everything that’s a ‘must-read’, we couldn’t finish in many lifetimes. But I took their word for it, and it’s very good. I thought it was time I read something by him.

Quote of the Day: Carl Trueman on Luther’s Theology of the Cross

This is something in the category of Suffering, which would have gone on the old Suffering Christians blog.

If the cross of Christ, the most evil act in human history, can be in line with God’s will and be the source of the decisive defeat of the very evil that caused it, then any other evil can also be subverted to the cause of good.

More than that, if the death of Christ is mysteriously a blessing, then any evil that the believer experiences can be a blessing too. Yes, the curse is reversed; yes, blessings will flow; but who declared that these blessings have to be in accordance with the aspirations and expectations of affluent America? The lesson of the cross for Luther is that the most blessed person upon earth, Jesus Christ himself, was revealed as blessed precisely in his suffering and death. And if that is the way that God deals with his beloved son, have those who are united to him by faith any right to expect anything different?

in the moment of the cross, it becomes clear that evil is utterly subverted for good. Romans 8:28 is true because of the cross of Christ: if God can take the greatest of evils and turn it to the greatest of goods, then how much more can he take the lesser evils which litter human history, from individual tragedies to international disasters, and turn them to his good purpose as well.

–Carl Trueman, Luther’s Theology of the Cross, New Horizons (October 2005) — regarding Martin Luther’s Theses at the Heidelberg Disputation

HT: Warren Cruz at Underdog Theology – go there for Luther’s theses and Trueman’s article, which is fantastic

Revering the Name of God

The name of the Lord should be held in great reverence and should never be mentioned without praise and thanksgiving, which are a certain kind of worship and divine service.

–Marthin Luther, First Lectures on Galatians

Galatians 1:5 NLT
All glory to God forever and ever! Amen.

Matthew 6:9 NLT
Our Father in heaven, may your name be kept holy.