Tag Archive for '1 Corinthians'

Phrasing of 1 Corinthians 1:17-31, 2:1-5

This is an old one, but I thought I’d mention it again for those who are interested in this stuff.

For some it makes no sense and doesn’t help at all. For others like me it really helps in understanding a passage although I’m sure it’s much more beneficial to look at one you’ve worked on yourself than one that someone else has done.

Phrasing of 1 Corinthians 1:17-31, 2:1-5 (PDF Document)

I’ve asked this in the past, but if anyone knows of any examples they know of out there, I’d love to see them.

Quotes on 1 Corinthians 2:2

I thought I would pull together all the quotes from the comments in yesterday’s post. If you have others let me know.

1 Corinthians 2:2
For I resolved to know nothing while I was with you except Jesus Christ and him crucified.

C.K. Barrett:

Of all the epistles, those to the Corinthians are most full of Christian paradox–of strength that is perfect in weakness (…); and the heart of the paradox is the preaching of the feeble and stupid message of the crucified Christ, which nevertheless proves to have a power and a wisdom no human eloquence possesses, since it is the power and wisdom of God himself.

F.F. Bruce:

Paul’s insistence on ‘knowing nothing’ among the Corinthians ‘except Jesus Christ and him crucified’ (1 Corinthians 2:2) had some regard to the intellectual climate of the city. As he came to know something of the Corinthians’ reverence for the current wisdom, he stressed that element in the gospel for which current wisdom could have no place: what more abject spectacle of folly and helplessness could be imagined than a crucified man? A crucified deliverer was to Greeks an absurd contradiction in terms, just as to Jews a crucified Messiah was a piece of scandalous blasphemy. But as Paul persisted in preaching Jesus as the crucified Saviour and sin-bearer, the unexpected happened: pagans, as well as Jews and God-fearers, believed the message and found their lives transformed by a new, liberating power, which broke the stranglehold of selfishness and vice and purified them from within. The message of Christ crucified had thus accomplished something which no body of Greek philosophic teaching could have done for them.

John Calvin:

In adding the word crucified, he does not mean that he preached nothing respecting Christ except the cross; but that, with all the abasement of the cross, he nevertheless preached Christ. It is as though he had said: ‘The ignominy of the cross will not prevent me from looking up to him from whom salvation comes, or make me ashamed to regard all my wisdom as comprehended in him — in him, I say, whom proud men despise and reject on account of the reproach of the cross.’ Hence the statement must be explained in this way: ‘No kind of knowledge was in my view of so much importance as to lead me to desire anything but Christ, crucified though he was.

Gordon Fee:

The ‘for’ that begins this sentence is explanatory; Paul is offering reasons for the behavior outlined in v. 1. (…) ‘To know nothing’ does not mean that he left all other knowledge aside, but rather that he had the gospel, with its crucified Messiah, as his singular focus and passion while he was among them.

David Garland:

…he [Paul] was content to be identified as a know-nothing who preached foolishness: Jesus Christ crucified. But announcing the gospel was his sole focus, and the cross molded his entire message and his whole approach. It was not a new development arising from some previous failure (cf. Acts 17:22-31) but his standard procedure everywhere* (cf. 1 Thess. 2:1-10; Gal. 3:1). Jesus Christ can only be preached as the crucified one, and no one can preach Christ crucified to win personal renowon.

R.C. Sproul:

he [Paul] told the Corinthians he had determined to know nothing except Christ crucified. Clearly Paul was determined to know all kinds of things besides the person and work of Jesus. He wanted to teach the Corinthians about the deep things of the character and nature of God the Father. He planned to instruct them about the person and work of the Holy Spirit, about Christian ethics, and about many other things that go beyond the immediate scope of Christ’s work on the cross. So why, then, did he say this? The answer is obvious. Paul was saying that in all of his teaching, in all of his preaching, in all of his missionary activity, the central point of importance was the cross.

Book Review – Paul for Everyone: 1 Corinthians by Tom Wright

book-1-corinthians-for everyonePaul for Everyone: 1 Corinthians by Tom Wright

This little book (256 pages long but small in dimensions) by Tom (also known as N.T.) Wright really is for everyone. Although it is “approachable and anecdotal in style”, even those who have read the bigger commentaries would benefit from this book.

Wright manages to combine personal anecdotes, exegesis, exposition and even a bit of Greek word study in an oblique way for every passage of 1 Corinthians. This is quite masterful.

He has written his own translation for the whole book of 1 Corinthians. Here is an example of 2:14-3:4:

Someone who is merely human doesn’t accept the things of God’s spirit. They are foolishness to such people, you see, and they can’t understand them because they need to be discerned spiritually. 15 But spiritual people discern everything, while nobody else can discern the truth about them! 16 For ‘Who has know the mind of the Lord, so as to instruct him?’ But we have the mind of the Messiah.

3:1 In my own case, my dear family, I couldn’t speak to you as spiritual people, but as people who were all too obviously merely human, little babies in the Messiah. 2 I fed you with milk, not solid food, because you weren’t able to take it — and you still can’t, even now! 3 You’re still determined to live in the old way! Yes, wherever there is jealousy and quarrelling, doesn’t that mean you’re living in the old way, behaving as any merely human being might do? 4 When someone says ‘I’m with Paul!’, and someone else says ‘I’m with Apollos!’ are you not mere humans?

That gives you an idea of how long each section of Scripture is. The exposition is typically about four pages.

His translation, like his exposition, is also a mixture of sorts being somewhat literal, dynamic and paraphrastic all in one where appropriate. One little annoyance is he says you see in almost every passage.

Another small annoyance is as he is wont to do, he let’s his political and social comments slip in now and then but it’s very infrequent and not very obvious.

This book is very well put together and although it’s very accessible for everyone, it’s deep and insightful enough to truly be for everyone.

There is a helpful glossary in the back of the book where he provides a paragraph description of select terms. I especially liked kingdom of God, kingdom of heaven.

Wright has a whole series of “For Everyone” books. Search for:
Tom Wright For Everyone
using the Amazon search box in the right sidebar here.

I think it would be great if there were Bible study guides to go along with these for group Bible study.

Paperback: 272 pages
Publisher: Westminster John Knox Press (March 2004)
ISBN-10: 0664227910
ISBN-13: 978-0664227913

Buy it at:

Stop it!

The beginning of 1 Corinthians 3:18 (Stop deceiving yourselves) reminds me of this skit with Bob Newhart. Many of you have seen it but for those who haven’t, it may be worth it.

There are some things we need to be healed of, some things we need to be delivered from and some things we simply just need to stop doing. This is my kind of therapy for the latter.

I bet the Corinthians didn’t blame their parents for all their problems.

John 6:43
Jesus answered them, “Stop complaining among yourselves.”

Luke 6:37
“Stop judging others, and you will not be judged. Stop criticizing others, or it will all come back on you. If you forgive others, you will be forgiven.”

Luke 8:52
The house was filled with people weeping and wailing, but he said, “Stop the weeping! She isn’t dead; she is only asleep.”

1 Corinthians 1:10
Now, dear brothers and sisters, I appeal to you by the authority of the Lord Jesus Christ to stop arguing among yourselves.

Ephesians 4:28
If you are a thief, stop stealing.

Colossians 3:8
But now you must also put away all the following: anger, wrath, malice, slander, and filthy language from your mouth.

2 Timothy 2:14
Remind everyone of these things, and command them in God’s name to stop fighting over words.

1 Corinthians 3:18 as applied to serious students of the Bible

1 Corinthians

1 Corinthians 3:18
Stop deceiving yourselves. If you think you are wise by this world’s standards, you need to become a fool to be truly wise. (NLT)

I memorized this to give myself a reminder not to think I’m all that and a cup of tea. However, God convicted me on a deeper level.

According to what’s written in 1 Corinthians 1:17-31 and all of the first four chapters, I can become like the Corinthians in that I can read my commentaries, use my interlinear etc. and think I’m wise because of my studiousness. I’m now on a higher plain because of this. However:

1 Corinthians 4:7
For what gives you the right to make such a judgment? What do you have that God hasn’t given you? And if everything you have is from God, why boast as though it were not a gift?

This all came about last night. I was feeling burnt out on the studying I was doing and was afraid that my spiritual zeal was waning. I was thinking, “What now God? Take a break? Direct my focus elsewhere for a while?” This break in the action allowed God to speak to me. He let me know that all this is to get to know Him better and focus on Christ and Him crucified, which I knew, but had to slow down to really ponder it.

And also the conviction of pride as described above. Although it can be painful, I love being convicted by the Holy Spirit because it is God speaking to me.

I hope to write more about general observations and questions on 1 Corinthians 1 and 2.

Some Conclusions Confirmed In Studying 1 Corinthians 1

1 Corinthians

I had come up with some conclusions in reading and studying the 1 Corinthians 1:17-2:5 passage on my own, under the Holy Spirit of course (see the other blog if you want various boring details).

  1. The second half of verse 17 really goes with the rest of the chapter even though there is a paragraph break in most translations
  2. Verse 19 (For it is written, “I WILL DESTROY THE WISDOM OF THE WISE, AND THE CLEVERNESS OF THE CLEVER I WILL SET ASIDE.” Isaiah 29:14) is nothing new and Paul is stating a timeless truth (not that other truths aren’t timeless)
  3. Verse 29 is the crux of the whole chapter
  4. This passage (1 Corinthians 1:17-31) is key to the whole book and to Paul’s rhetoric in delivery and content of the gospel message

Most of these things may seem obvious. After this I read Fee’s commentary on 1 Corinthians on this passage and he mentions the things noted above. I like his commentaries because he often answers questions I have and he doesn’t just exegete each verse or paragraph, he gets to what’s really important about a passage, how it fits with the rest of the chapter, book, writer etc. and why.

1. He says that it’s unfortunate that there is a paragraph break in most English translations between verse 17 and 18 because the “for” at the beginning of verse 18 ties it to verse 17 as an explanation of the final clause in that verse.

2. Fee says that the wisdom of the crucifixion is the fulfillment of the Isaiah passage.

3. He says, “With this clause Paul expresses the ultimate purpose of the divine folly: ‘so that no one may boast before him'”.

4:

This paragraph [1 Corinthians 1:18-25] is crucial not only to the present argument (1:10-4:21) but to the entire letter as well. Indeed, it is one of the truly great moments in the apostle Paul. Here he argues, with OT support, that what God had always intended and had foretold in the prophets, he has now accomplished through the crucifixion: He has brought an end to human self-sufficiency as it is evidenced through human wisdom and devices.

I’ve also read Barrett and will be rereading Garland (on this passage) which I read a few months ago. I’m not implying that Fee is always right and if my assertions agree with him they are automatically correct. But Fee’s commentary seems to speak better for lack of a better term. I always seem to like his style. It’s gratifying to see some of the work on this may be going in the right direction.

In studying 1 Corinthians in our group study, I decided to concentrate on this passage and I can’t say how valuable it’s been.

More posts to come.

F.F. Bruce on Paul’s Gospel

1 Corinthians

Paul’s insistence on ‘knowing nothing’ among the Corinthians ‘except Jesus Christ and him crucified’ (1 Corinthians 2:2) had some regard to the intellectual climate of the city. As he came to know something of the Corinthians’ reverence for the current wisdom, he stressed that element in the gospel for which current wisdom could have no place: what more abject spectacle of folly and helplessness could be imagined than a crucified man? A crucified deliverer was to Greeks an absurd contradiction in terms, just as to Jews a crucified Messiah was a piece of scandalous blasphemy. But as Paul persisted in preaching Jesus as the crucified Saviour and sin-bearer, the unexpected happened: pagans, as well as Jews and God-fearers, believed the message and found their lives transformed by a new, liberating power, which broke the stranglehold of selfishness and vice and purified them from within. The message of Christ crucified had thus accomplished something which no body of Greek philosophic teaching could have done for them.

–F.F. Bruce, Paul: Apostle of the Heart Set Free

I would like to post more on this in the near future.

Making the Gospel Seeker Sensitive

There have been volumes written against making the gospel more palatable for those who are “seekers”, whatever that means, and contextualizing the gospel, for which there are many definitions.

I think it can be narrowed down to this:

1 Corinthians 1:18 NASB
For the word of the cross is foolishness to those who are perishing, but to us who are being saved it is the power of God.

I would gather that seeker-sensitive preachers and evangelists don’t want to make the the gospel sound like foolishness. But if we make it more palatable and use logic and worldly wisdom so that people will accept it on an intellectual level without truly believing, they are putting some of them on rocky soil right from the start. Is that what we want to do to people?

2 Peter 2:21 NRSV
For it would have been better for them never to have known the way of righteousness than, after knowing it, to turn back from the holy commandment that was passed on to them.

Jesus and Paul didn’t make it easy enter the kingdom. (Matt 7:13-14, Matt 19:21-22)

Regarding the cross as foolishness, here are some quotes from commentators:

Longenecker, Galatians:

Today, after almost two millennia of the cross as a sacred symbol, it is difficult for Christians to appreciate the repugnance and horror with which the cross was viewed among both Jews and Gentiles in the first century. The only things comparable in our day would be venerating an electric chair or wearing a hangman’s noose around our necks as a symbol of our religious devotion. Indeed, as Paul says in 1 Cor 1:23, the proclamation of ‘Christ crucified’ was ‘a stumbling block to Jews and foolishness to Gentiles.’

Garland, 1 Corinthians:

He [Paul] does not say that he preached the resurrected Christ, but the crucified Christ. Crucifixion and resurrection belong together as part of the gospel story (1 Cor 15:3-5), but the cross was repugnant to ancient sensibilities and assailed the world’s self-centeredness and self-destructive ways. It was not yet the ‘old rugged cross’ sentimentalized in hymns, embalmed in stained-glass windows, perched on marble altars, or fashioned into gold charms.

Christianity was cradled in what looks like disastrous defeat, and the unspeakable stigma of the cross exposed the preacher of this message to woeful contempt. Paul, however, did not refer to Jesus’ death with embarrassment or skip over the awkward facts.

…the message of the cross is an antidote to human self-glorification.

Paul left…yielding, to the persuasion of the Spirit.

Holy Kiss

1 Corinthians

1 Corinthians 16:20
All the brothers and sisters send greetings. Greet one another with a holy kiss.
(NRSV)

In Garland’s commentary on 1 Corinthians he says, “The kiss is more than an extension of social custom, since it is identified as ‘holy.’ It was a distinctive practice that served as a sign of mutual fellowship among persons of mixed social background, nationality, race, and gender who are joined together as a new family in Christ.”

This reminded me of a blog post I came across:

Why You Should Hug In Church

Related Scripture:
Romans 16:16, 1 Corinthians 16:20, 2 Corinthians 13:12, 1 Thessalonians 5:26

“God never gives you more than you can handle”

1 Corinthians

Is this Scriptural? 1 Corinthians 10:13 says, “No temptation has overtaken you that is not common to man. God is faithful, and he will not let you be tempted beyond your ability, but with the temptation he will also provide the way of escape, that you may be able to endure it.”

What many fail to realize is that 1 Corinthians chapters 8-10 involves eating food sacrificed to an idol at the temple of an idol, eating food bought from a market which may or may not have been sacrificed to an idol and eating in the home of an unbeliever.

This is a serious enough issue that Paul devotes quite a bit of his letter to it. Socializing and eating together was an important part of the Corinthian culture both personally and for business networking (to use a modern term). At the same time idol worship and sacrificing was so common that it was difficult to avoid. It’s not just a matter of causing others to stumble (1 Corinthians 8:10-11) but that idol worship is participation in the demonic (1 Corinthians 10:20).

Paul tells the Corinthians in 10:12, “Therefore let anyone who thinks that he stands take heed lest he fall.” (…back into idol worship and falling away from the faith.)

Some have dissected the phrase “God never gives you more than you can handle” but I don’t see the value in it if it isn’t Biblical.

Jump ahead to 2 Corinthians 1:8-9, “For we do not want you to be ignorant, brothers, of the affliction we experienced in Asia. For we were so utterly burdened beyond our strength that we despaired of life itself. Indeed, we felt that we had received the sentence of death. But that was to make us rely not on ourselves but on God who raises the dead.” I would guess Paul wasn’t thinking, “God never gives you more than you can handle.” Although it did strengthen his faith and he continues to have hope in God. “He delivered us from such a deadly peril, and he will deliver us. On him we have set our hope that he will deliver us again.”
(2 Corinthians 1:10)

There are all kinds of questions and issues that go along with this that I’m not prepared enough or wise enough to write about at this time other than to point to some Scripture on God’s Sovereignty from 30nov07. Someday I’d like to expand on “strangely comforting.”

Lawsuits, Disputes and Misquoted Scripture

1 Corinthians

Paul speaks against lawsuits among believers:
1 Corinthians 6:1-9:
“When one of you has a grievance against another, does he dare go to law before the unrighteous instead of the saints? Or do you not know that the saints will judge the world? And if the world is to be judged by you, are you incompetent to try trivial cases? Do you not know that we are to judge angels? How much more, then, matters pertaining to this life! So if you have such cases, why do you lay them before those who have no standing in the church? I say this to your shame. Can it be that there is no one among you wise enough to settle a dispute between the brothers, but brother goes to law against brother, and that before unbelievers? To have lawsuits at all with one another is already a defeat for you. Why not rather suffer wrong? Why not rather be defrauded? But you yourselves wrong and defraud–even your own brothers! Or do you not know that the unrighteous will not inherit the kingdom of God?”

In Garland’s commentary on 1 Corinthians he says, “The aim of the ancient lawsuit was to prevail over another, and that usually involved an assault on the opponent’s character. Paul rejects this philosophy altogether; to try to down a fellow Christian before, and with the aid of, those who do not worship God is completely inimical to Christian love.”

Jesus tells us to love our enemies and not retaliate when an offense is committed. Should not this apply to fellow brothers and sisters also?
Matthew 5:38-48
“You have heard that it was said, ‘An eye for an eye and a tooth for a tooth.’ But I say to you, Do not resist the one who is evil. But if anyone slaps you on the right cheek, turn to him the other also. And if anyone would sue you and take your tunic, let him have your cloak as well. And if anyone forces you to go one mile, go with him two miles. Give to the one who begs from you, and do not refuse the one who would borrow from you. “You have heard that it was said, ‘You shall love your neighbor and hate your enemy.’ But I say to you, Love your enemies and pray for those who persecute you, so that you may be sons of your Father who is in heaven. For he makes his sun rise on the evil and on the good, and sends rain on the just and on the unjust. For if you love those who love you, what reward do you have? Do not even the tax collectors do the same? And if you greet only your brothers, what more are you doing than others? Do not even the Gentiles do the same? You therefore must be perfect, as your heavenly Father is perfect.

How are we to deal with this? Matthew 18:19-20 is an often (mis)quoted passage when referring to prayer. But looking at the context it can be seen that it’s part of a passage in how to deal with disputes.
Matthew 18:15-20
“If your brother sins against you, go and tell him his fault, between you and him alone. If he listens to you, you have gained your brother. But if he does not listen, take one or two others along with you, that every charge may be established by the evidence of two or three witnesses. If he refuses to listen to them, tell it to the church. And if he refuses to listen even to the church, let him be to you as a Gentile and a tax collector. Truly, I say to you, whatever you bind on earth shall be bound in heaven, and whatever you loose on earth shall be loosed in heaven. Again I say to you, if two of you agree on earth about anything they ask, it will be done for them by my Father in heaven. For where two or three are gathered in my name, there am I among them.”

I’m not wise enough to say exactly how to go about this in the present day, when it might be absolutely necessary to go to court etc. I just thought it might be good to mention these things and tie a few passages together even if for only my own benefit.

Our Reward in Heaven

1 Corinthians

In Garland’s commentary on 1 Corinthians he talks about 1 Corinthians 4:5:
“Paul now specifies what the reward is that he only alluded to in 3:8 and 3:14. It is praise from God (cf. Rom. 2:29; 1 Pet. 1:7).”

1 Peter 1:7
so that the tested genuineness of your faith–more precious than gold that perishes though it is tested by fire–may be found to result in praise and glory and honor at the revelation of Jesus Christ.

Wesley:
“Unto praise – From God himself. And honour – From men and angels. And glory – Assigned by the great Judge.”

Gill:
“his faith be found unto praise by him, he will have praise of him himself; it will be said unto him, “Well done, good and faithful servant”; his faith will be praised for its steadiness and constancy, notwithstanding all persecutions and tribulations; and his good works, the fruits of faith, will be taken notice of by him with commendation; he will be honoured, by being placed on the right hand of Christ, and by being set down with him in his throne, and having a crown of righteousness given to him;”

Clarke:
“he who doeth the will of God shall abide for ever, and his faith shall then be found to the praise of God’s grace, the honor of Christ, and the glory or glorification of his own soul throughout eternity. God himself will praise such faith, angels and men will hold it in honor, and Christ will crown it with glory.”

Related Scripture:
Matthew 6:3-4, Romans 2:29, 1 Corinthians 3:14 (teachers), Ephesians 6:7-8, Colossians 3:23-24 among others

I believe our reward is more than just salvation. I’m not sure if there will be any sort of levels or status in heaven but Scripture indicates we will be praised for good works, persevering in the faith etc. Some will enter only as through fire. (1 Corinthians 3:15)

Here is another take on it with John Piper reading a section of a sermon by Jonathan Edwards called Levels of Happiness in Heaven.

God’s Wisdom

1 Corinthians

The Corinthians were very much into secular wisdom, individualism, egocentricity, prestige, power, philosophy, debate, etc.

I love how God in His wisdom had Paul preach what is foolish to the Corinthians.

1 Corinthians 1:21-24
For since, in the wisdom of God, the world did not know God through wisdom, it pleased God through the folly of what we preach to save those who believe. For Jews demand signs and Greeks seek wisdom, but we preach Christ crucified, a stumbling block to Jews and folly to Gentiles, but to those who are called, both Jews and Greeks, Christ the power of God and the wisdom of God.

It’s interesting how Jesus and Paul made it more difficult to be saved than easy. They wanted to make sure that Christians are true believers who are drawn by God and spoken to by the Holy Spirit instead of those who just agree with the Gospel on an intellectual level and don’t truly believe or love God.

What could be more foolish to people like the Corinthians than a person dying on a cross? David Garland in his commentary on 1 Corinthians says, “To be full of oneself as a golden-tonged orator is the opposite of emptying oneself (of oneself), which is the paradigm presented by the cross.” He goes on later to say, “He does not say that he preached the resurrected Christ, but the crucified Christ. Crucifixion and resurrection belong together as part of the gospel story (1 Corinthians 15:3-5), but the cross was repugnant to ancient sensibilities and assailed the world’s self-centeredness and self-destructive ways. It was not yet the ‘old rugged cross’ sentimentalized in hymns, embalmed in stained-glass windows, perched on marble altars, or fashioned into gold charms.”

There were no altar calls or asking people to pray the sinner’s prayer. The message was simple. The persuasion was left to the Holy Spirit.

As a side note I found that 1 Corinthians 1:21 (a) and 1 Corinthians 1:29 serve as bookends to what is explained in between. Together they are, “For since, in the wisdom of God, the world did not know God through wisdom, so that no human being might boast in the presence of God.”

It’s unlikely that the typical Corinthian (or us) is going to boast in something that seems foolish to us. Salvation through someone’s death on a cross is not something anyone would come up with in their own wisdom. And even if they did, it’s not something they would present as an orator for people to marvel at.

Proclamation of the name of Jesus Christ

Romans

I’m finally ready to start writing about what I’ve been learning. I’m currently going through 1 Corinthians (Baker Exegetical Commentary on the New Testament)but want to backtrack and try to write about some things from reading Romans and Romans (Baker Exegetical Commentary on the New Testament) by Thomas Schreiner.

The first thing that struck me is that according to Schreiner, “The ultimate reason for a mission to the Gentiles was not the salvation of the Gentiles but the proclamation of the name of Jesus Christ.”

That can be tied in with what Garland says in his commentary on 1 Corinthians. He quotes Litfin (1994: 261) outlining five steps of persuasion in Greco-Roman rhetoric (which would be very common in Corinth): (1) attention, (2) comprehension, (3) yielding, (4) retention, and (5) action.

Galand says Paul left the third step, yielding, to the persuasion of the Spirit.

To the Corinthians Paul preached Christ crucified which was foolishness to the Corinthians. (1 Cor. 1:18-25) With no art of persuasion in preaching how else could they believe except through the Holy Spirit? It’s only through the Holy Spirit that we are baptized and saved, not through persuasion and intellectual knowledge.

Here is a great quote from John MacArthur:

The decision of yielding, surrendering and then acting, is between the hearer and God, not between the hearer and the preacher. It is the Holy Spirit’s work.Preaching is proclaiming saving truth, sanctifying truth, and strengthening truth from Scripture, the rest is up to the Holy Spirit. So Paul says, I was entrusted with the proclamation. That’s all that I can do. All I can do is to get their attention and bring comprehension. The message is the Scripture, and since the message is the Scripture, beloved, it should be patently obvious to everyone that the proper kind of preaching should be “expository preaching.” That is the only legitimate way to be true to the divine message.

You know as well as I know that I could manipulate people with stories. I mean, you could tell a tear-jerking story and effect emotional trauma on people. You can move people with things other than the Scriptures, but you are working on their feelings and not on their mind. The message is Scripture. And if the message is Scripture and the preacher is to preach the message he has to preach the Scripture; and preaching the Scripture means you must exposit the Word.

This found at Reformed Geek. Follow the link and discussion for more.