Archive for the 'Other Blog' Category

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I’m still here and still have ideas for posts. The mojo should come back at some point, God willing.

Baker Book House Church Connection | How Well Do You Really Know Greek? – Can we even trust our commentaries?

8 Reasons We Need the Puritans | The Gospel Coalition

Jesus our Pilot « The Reformed Reader – God is not our “co-pilot”. If you hear somebody say this, in the most polite manner, tell them it’s idiotic.

How I Read, Take Notes, and Process Information from Books — Danny Zacharias – Not the typical methods that I’ve seen

You Should Care | Monergism – Monergism and Seinfeld?

Suffering and the Sovereignty of God: An Interview with R.C. Sproul Jr. on Vimeo

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I realize I haven’t been blogging much lately. Hopefully I’ll get back into it at some point.

Audio Bible Name Pronunciation Tool | The Bible Workshop

Does the Gospel Threaten? – Reformation21 Blog – Fear God; Fear the Gospel

Baker Book House Church Connection | John Frame’s Thoughts on Joel Osteen – He goes way easier on him than I would, and leaves out much of what I’ve seen of him, including interviews where he can’t bring himself to say that Jesus is the only way to the Father. But it somehow seems instructive to me, since he seems to have thought this out and tried to look at him objectively.

My Bible… My Idol? – It would be nice if this could be put to rest.

‘Yeah, well they all thought the earth was flat, too…’ | Cryptotheology – Not everybody thought the earth was flat; the Bible is silent on it. (So I wish some people would stop using it as an argument!)

How Memorization Feeds Your Imagination | The Gospel Coalition

When we have the entire Bible available as an app on our smartphones, it seems an unnecessary waste of time and effort to memorize specific verses or the grand narrative of the story. By relying on technology to do our remembering for us, we have forgotten the moral aspect of memorization. “A trained memory wasn’t just about gaining easy access to information,” says Jonathan Foer, referring to the ancient world, “it was about strengthening one’s personal ethics and becoming a more complete person.” Foer adds that the thinking of the ancients was that only through memorization could ideas truly be incorporated into one’s psyche and their values absorbed. “Indeed, the single most common theme in the lives of the saints—besides their superhuman goodness—is their often extraordinary memories,” Foer notes.

Albert Einstein reportedly said, “Never memorize something that you can look up.” That doesn’t apply to Scripture.

I memorize for many reasons. It’s obviously a gift from God because it’s not something I could normally do. One of the lesser reasons I memorize Scripture, which may be paranoid, is that if I ever become blind, I will have a lot of Scripture in my head. It’s the same reason I collect free Christian audio books when they’re offered. I can certainly confirm what’s written in this article, as can just about everyone else who has Scripture memorized. It’s a great angle to look at it from.

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Logic Proves Women Are Spiritual Leaders Over Men? | Tim's Blog – Just One Train Wreck After Another – Logic. It’s a good thing.

Thursday is for Thinkers: How to Love a Loved One with Mental Illness | The Exchange | A Blog by Ed Stetzer

50 Micro-Book Reviews from 2014 | Scribblepreach

Until Someone Unsettles It | Blog and Mablog – My annual link defending young earth

Surveying the Text: Ecclesiastes | Blog and Mablog – Another from Doug Wilson – A good intro to Ecclesiastes

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A Prophet for an Un-discerning Church | MOS – Alliance of Confessing Evangelicals – I’ve thought similar to this article for a few years and caught a little flack from it. A pastor would need to be very brave because so many women would be on his case about this.

Beth Moore Deserves Better | MOS – Alliance of Confessing Evangelicals – Another perspective

I include the above two links because for a few years I have felt similarly to what’s written in the first post, and think that they can write about this topic much better than I can. Beth Moore and the also mentioned Joyce Meyer have a very significant influence on a lot of women. I fully endorse what the above posts say. (If you read the first, please read the second.) If I get criticized, it’s OK. My blog allows comments and theirs do not, so I’m taking a risk. Most supporters will say, “But she’s done so much good for so many people.” Misguided teaching and sloppy use of Scripture will lead many people to bad soil (Mark 4:3-9). There are so many better teachers out there. Look for anything by Nancy Guthrie as an example, both as a writer and editor. If you’d like to hear from a woman on a similar subject, Aimee Byrd, who completes the trio of The Mortificatin of Spin, can be heard on one of their shorter podcasts called Best Seller Sell-Outs. Discernment is lacking among many evangelicals of either gender these days.

My Big, Hairy, Audacious Goal For This Year – It’s Not What You Think – Similar to my little peach fuzz post
HT: Links I like

20 Reading Tips | HeadHeartHand Blog

God might call you to be ignored
“We speak [the gospel], we pray, we plead… and there’s nothing. For many, your words are nothing more than the incoherent mutterings of Charlie Brown’s school teacher.” This is encouraging for me, I guess.

Tangled Up in Blue: Depression and the Christian Life – Reformation21 – a repeat, but worth it

Spurgeon’s Sorrows: Realistic Hope for Those Who Suffer from Depression | Westminster Bookstore – $5.50 or less – I haven’t read it but there is a sample available

Around the Web

These are a lot of links. I think there are some good ones. I probably won’t post much or anything through at least the 29th.

Acts 17:11 Bible Study: Theology – The Knowledge of God – C.S. Lewis on Theology

Christmas: Night and Day “So the message is far more good news declaration than it is argumentation.”

Baker Book House Church Connection | How Do Mountains and Stars Worship? – I’ve often wondered this too. Although I don’t think of worship as only “verbal, emotionally charged expressions of praise”. Many everyday things, from drinking a cup of coffee to taking care of my body by exercising it are part of worshiping God.

When Risking it All for God Means Staying Where You Are | RELEVANT Magazine

Baker Book House Church Connection | What’s the “Aorist” Tense?

Baker Book House Church Connection | Moisés Silva on “Agape” Love – It’s more than what you think

Live-Blog: Doug Moo’s Special Message on Bible Translation (Live Presentation from ETS 2014) | Bible Gateway Blog

Reformed Theology Is Covenant Theology

If you, like me, need to learn more about what covenant theology is, here are a couple of good articles.

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I’ll just post this for the long weekend to give you any reading material you might want.

I pray that anyone reading this will have a nice Thanksgiving, for those who celebrate it. For those with no family or who are going through afflictions in any way, I pray that God’s grace will be sufficient for you. Let’s remember that not everybody is happy and shiny during holidays.

Rethinking the Text: God’s “Still, Small Voice”? | internetmonk.com

“God told me” and the Sufficiency of Scripture : 9Marks

Friendship sexualized, trivialized, and For Profit | MOS – Alliance of Confessing Evangelicals

Pitting Holiness Against Holiness – we are made holy; we are to be holy

The Upward Call – The language of grumbling – this is something I’ve been working on a lot
Also see: Murmuring Is A Sin | Scripture Zealot blog
HT: Links I like

Learning about Pain from Luther, Bunyan & th| Bible | Desiring God by John Piper, Daily Devotionals Online, Bible Study, Christian Video

Puritan Perspectives on the Lord’s Prayer

Let us have a great esteem of the Lord’s prayer; let it be the model and pattern of all our prayers. There is a double benefit arising from framing our petitions suitably to this prayer. Hereby error in prayers is prevented. It is not easy to write wrong after this copy; we cannot easily err when we have our pattern before us. Hereby mercies requested are obtained; for the apostle assures us that God will hear us when we pray ‘according to his will.’ I John V 14. And sure we pray according to his will when we pray according to the pattern he has set us. So much for the introduction to the Lord’s prayer, ‘After this manner pray ye.’

“Lord, teach us to pray” (Luke 11:1).
–Thomas Watson, The Lord’s Prayer, 2.

Around the Web – Oct.24.2014

Why Study Revelation? – Word of Life Wisconsin

Union with Christ (eBooks) | Monergism – I will be reading the ones by Watson and Horton – I found that a good way to convert a web page to ePub is to save it in a word processor as an HTML document, then use Calibre to convert it to ePub

Baker Book House Church Connection | Mark 13, the ESV, and Essentially Literal Translation

4 Things That Happen When You Study Leviticus More Than 10 Years | The Gospel Coalition

Why Christians Should Listen to Mike Rowe on (Not) 'Following Your Passion' | Acton PowerBlog – goes along with ‘if you can dream it, you can do it’, ‘you can do anything you put your mind to’

Lumina – new Bible.org Bible study app

‘Must Read’ Blog Post

I don’t know if I’ve ever written ‘must read’ other than I feel that the book Knowing God is a must read for every Christian, especially those somewhat new (advanced beginner?), as far as I’m concerned.

I found a blog post titled Bible Ignorance at Reformation21 Blog to be one of the best posts I’ve ever read. It’s aimed largely at ministers and students of theology. I’m not pointing it out for ministers; I think this applies to any student of theology, which is all of us.

You can just stop reading here and go there if you’d like.

A few years ago I made a commitment to make sure I read the Bible every single day.* What’s being said in this article makes that seem like nothing, not that I’m minimizing the importance of it. It’s nothing new; nothing we probably haven’t read before, but it really hit me this time. Matthew Henry says to pray using the language of the Bible. D.A. Carson urges us to imitate Paul in our praying. Comparing my worldly prayers to Paul’s really changed how and what I pray for. This can’t happen without knowing the Bible.

Scripture is so deep and multi-faceted, not just because of what’s written, but because the Holy Spirit opens our eyes to more and more of it the more we read and understand it (Ephesians 1:17, Hebrews 4:12). If we’re born again and the Holy Spirit resides in us, we should be glad to spend time in Scripture. If we don’t feel that way, we can pray for God to enable us, and he will do that for us–this being his will for us (Joshua 1:8, Psalm 119:9-11), as we strive to spend more time (Matthew 21:22, Psalm 37:4, 1 John 5:14, Philippians 2:12b).

I often think about how much time I spend reading the Bible versus how much time I spend reading books and articles. It’s difficult to know how to balance it because the books all help to know God better through better understanding of Scripture.

*If I should forget a day for some strange reason, which I’ve done a few times in the past, God is in no way displeased with me and I don’t feel guilty–just a little silly to forget something so important. I don’t read twice as much the next day to make up for it, unless I’m on a reading plan. This doesn’t happen anymore. Just thought I’d point that out so that it doesn’t sound like a legalistic or works oriented thing.

Around the Web – Sep.22.2014

Serving Those With Mental Illness: Free eBook | HeadHeartHand Blog

It Was a ‘God Thing’ (Really?) « The Reformed Reader – Michael Horton’s book is on my wish list

Does the Bible Ever Get it Wrong? | Canon Fodder

Over 125 Free eBooks Listed Alphabetically by Author | Monergism

Why We Don't Allow Comments – Reformation21 Blog – If you read it, be sure to make it through to the part about retired people. I allow comments on my blog because almost all of them are helpful and edifying, and because of the fact that I hardly get any comments, I don’t really have to spend time moderating.

Around the Web – Sep.4.2014

A smaller list than usual:

Covenant by Michael Horton | Reformed Theology Articles at Ligonier.org – a short and very educational article

3 Tips from C.S. Lewis on Blogging and Tweeting | Nathan W. Bingham – I especially need to pay attention to #2

5 Things Jonathan Edwards Teaches Us about the Christian Life | Crossway – not what you might think

Koinonia: Michael Horton's Pilgrim Theology: 4 Coordinates of Key Doctrines, Part 1 [Infographic]
Koinonia: [Part 2] Infographic – Michael Horton's Pilgrim Theology: 4 Coordinates of Key Doctrines

Around the Web – Aug.19.14

Becoming Christ-like: The Goal of the Christian Life? | Daniel B. Wallace

Reading Tips: Read and Retain

Excellent resources on depression – Reformation21 Blog

Stopping Suicide an Info Graphic – a repeat

Heidelberg Catechism | Scripture Zealot blog – 119 through the end is a very brief primer of the Lord’s prayer and what it entails, for any of you that might be helped by it

How does God lead us? | WisdomForLife

Around the Web – Aug.5.14

The Selfie – Housewife Theologian

'Bibliotheca' Bible Project Blows Up On Kickstarter With Chapterless Bible – The Bible as Jesus read it

The Dangers and Duty of Confessing Sin to One Another – Feeding on Christ – Buzzwords–transparency and vulnerability

When We Misinterpret God | Parchment and Pen

7 Different Ways to Read a Book | Challies Dot Com – some of these could apply to Bible reading (and some definitely not!)

Infographic: 6 Counterproductive Approaches to “Studying the Bible” | Crossway

Was Jonathan Edwards a Puritan? – Reformation21 Blog – this is also educational on who the Puritans were

Do inner promptings reveal God’s will? | WisdomForLife

22 Facts About Sleep That Will Surprise You (Infographic) — Health Hub from Cleveland Clinic – not exactly on topic, and this one has made the rounds, but I know that me and at least one other reader are interested in this – I’ve read about #12 a few times now

Around the Web – July.7.14

Intimate Friendships Among Christians-Housewife Theologian – a counter to the “When Harry Met Sally” syndrome

Gordon Fee: How Should We Read the Bible? | Grace Communion International – One of my favorite videos by any Christian

Systematic Theology (240-Page excerpt) by Dr. John Frame | Monergism

Free D.A. Carson PDF books | The Lighthearted Calvinist

Top Book Recommendations by some really smart guys

The History of Madness – “John Locke notes that there is a degree of madness in almost everyone. Madness is the inability to let reason sort out mad ideas.” I’ve always believed somewhat similarly. Jesus was the only perfectly sane person. He dealt with things during the last few days before the cross in a perfectly sane way.

This post is so good, I almost put it on its own page. I was going to write some things about it, but my own frustrations might creep in. I’ll just let you read it if you’re interested.
Modern Reformation – Faith and Mental Illness by Michael S. Horton

Around the Web – May.26.14

Offer Advice Very Carefully | CCEF

The Story of the Puritans | Monergism – eBook

6 Motives to Study The Least Popular Book In The Bible | HeadHeartHand Blog – If you meander through the Bible like I often do, and are deciding what to read, give the least popular book of the Bible a try, with these helps to give you perspective.

Touchstone Archives: The Gospel Truth of Jesus
HT: A New Twist on the Quadrilemma: Lord, Liar, Lunatic, or Legend? | Daniel B. Wallace

All The Prayers Of The Bible (PDF File)

What is an evangelical? – “Until very recently…”

The State of the Bible: 6 Trends for 2014 – Barna Group “More than half of Americans (56%) are ‘pro-Bible’—meaning they believe the Bible is the actual or inspired word of God with no errors.” — Ironically, many Christians believe there are errors. I’m pleasantly surprised by the 56%.

Top 10 Books on Depression | HeadHeartHand Blog

Free yellow flower photo:

Eranthus Flower
Click for a larger one

Photo © Jeff at Scripture Zealot